Browsing 'poultry' News

The GCC blockade affected the country to large extent especially the essential imports. Qatar though took up it as a challenge to be self-sufficient. It started many projects to promote “produce in Qatar” which have started yielding impressive results.

In food self-sufficiency, Qatar has made major developments in poultry and dairy products. As per recent statement issued by Saleh al Marri of the Ministry of Municipality and Environment (MME), Qatar has achieved 98 percent self-sufficiency in poultry with a total production of 21,500 tonnes of chicken.

As per Marri’ further statement there has also been a considerable development in achieving self-sufficiency of dairy products. He stated that the country has already achieved 82% self-sufficiency and the coming six month are expected to lead to 100% self-sufficiency in dairy products.

As per statement given to ‘The Peninsula’ Saleh Jarallah Al Marri said “we are trying to cover 100 percent need of frozen chicken in local market this year and to increase self-sufficiency of the country in dairy products from existing 82 percent to 100 percent during next six months.”

He explained that the ministry is planning on covering big portion of the need of red meat and eggs during next two years and is simultaneously working on four new dairy farms that will add to the existing capability to produce of the three functional farms making the total of seven dairy farms in the country.

He also explained that there are 11 functional poultry farms in the country and license has been granted to 12 new projects. Soon, a total of 23 poultry farms will be operational in the country which will enable to reach self-sufficiency targets.

Al Marri clarified that “All existing farms are working to complying Qatari specifications to compete the imported products. During recent past, we noticed growing demands for local products by the consumers that reflects the quality of the local products”.

From the time government has taken self-sufficiency drive, there has been considerable increase in food production like livestock and dairy products. The continued progress indicates that soon Qatar will be self-sufficient in most of the essential products.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Work on a sprawling QR1.6 billion poultry complex located in “strategic areas” across Qatar is officially underway, Dar Al Rayan Investment Co. has announced.

When finished, the project will provide a big boost for domestic chicken and egg production at a crucial time for Qatar, which is embroiled in a long dispute with its neighbors.

Yesterday, Dar Al Rayan said that its complex will have a production capacity of 70,000 tons of broiler meat and 250 million eggs per year.

Al Rayan Poultry

Egg production at Al Rayan Poultry

Al Rayan Poultry will span 15 million square meters of land across Qatar, including at farms in the south, in Al Waab and in the north.

Plans are also afoot to build a feed mill that can supply poultry producers around the nation.

In a statement, company official Mohammed Hussein Al Ali said:

“Our focus is not just to build a poultry farm, but to create a whole ecosystem that supports the production of domestic poultry products.

Steps like providing parent stock poultry feed and factory will all support and encourage smaller broiler meat production units in the country. This, in the long run will contribute significantly to the local economy and domestic food security.”

Past plans

Qatar has been talking about boosting domestic poultry production for years.

In 2014, the government announced plans to build a new chicken farm complex. There was even talk of floating an IPO on the public-private project.

But then in early 2015, the concept was put on hold amid other belt-tightening measures.

However, months later, Dar Al Rayyan was awarded QR1.3 billion by Qatar’s economy ministry after beating out three dozen other companies vying to set up a chicken farm.

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Sheikh Tamim addresses the nation about the Gulf dispute.

No completion date for the poultry complex has been disclosed yet. But the project has taken on new importance in recent months as Qatar works to become more self-sufficient.

Officials had to scramble to negotiate new trade partners and routes for food and other supplies in June after Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the UAE and Bahrain cut ties for political reasons.

Since then, Qatar’s Emir has called on citizens to use the crisis as an opportunity and a wakeup call.

“We are opening our economy to initiatives, investments, production of food, medicine and ultimately to diversify our sources of income,” Sheikh Tamim said during a national address in July.

Thoughts?

April Younglove / Flickr

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Reacting to avian flu outbreaks in other countries, Qatar has begun cracking down on live bird imports and exports.

According to Al Raya, a temporary ban has been placed on this type of animal.

A source at the Ministry of Municipality and Environment (MME) told the newspaper that the ban also applies to some fresh poultry and eggs.

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.

In the past few weeks, different strains of the bird flu virus have emerged in France, South Korea, India, the UK and many other nations.

In some countries, birds got sick and died of the flu, while in others, humans contracted the virus and grew ill or died.

Elsewhere in the Gulf, Saudi Arabia has in the past 10 days banned chickens and eggs from India, parts of France and Poland over bird flu concerns.

Safety first

The MME source told Al Raya that all poultry products currently inside of Qatar are safe and subject to rigorous inspection.

These imports cannot pass through Qatar’s ports of entry without certification from their home country that they are free of infectious diseases, he added.

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Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Veterinarians are also keeping tabs on geese, ostriches and other birds at local farms.

A few months ago in October, the MME said it was taking “precautionary measures” to protect residents against the spread of bird flu.

The virus can cause fever, malaise, cough, sore throat, muscle aches, abdominal pain, chest pain and diarrhea. These can then develop quickly and cause severe respiratory problems.

In a statement last week, the World Health Organization said:

“WHO advises that travelers to countries with known outbreaks of avian influenza should avoid, if possible, poultry farms, contact with animals in live bird markets, entering areas where poultry may be slaughtered, or contact with any surfaces that appear to be contaminated with feces from poultry or other animals.

Travelers should also wash their hands often with soap and water, and follow good food safety and good food hygiene practices.”

Thoughts?