Browsing 'arts' News

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October in Qatar typically means cooler weather and more opportunities to spend time outside. There’s also a lot to see indoors. Here’s a partial list of what’s on this month. What would you add?

  • QPW-Qatar Pro Wrestling, Oct. 3 to Oct. 5, Hyatt Plaza tent, 8pm. Doors open at 6pm for this event, which features Bobby Lashley, Carlito, Big V, Alofa, Matt Cross, Johnny Moss, Shehab Al Mossa, Rene Dupre, and others who are competing for the QPW belt. Tickets are now on sale at Virgin Megastores and range from QR100 to QR750 (VIP). Free admission for children under the age of two.
  • Alessandro Safina, Oct. 8, Qatar National Convention Center, 8:30pm. Door open at 7pm for this famous Italian romantic pop opera singer, who intends to woo audience members with passionate and soulful pieces previously performed around the world. Tickets are on sale at Virgin Megastores and cost QR250, QR390, QR550 and QR790.
  • Korean Cultural Week, Katara Cultural Village, Oct. 8 to Oct. 19, 8am to 11pm. To get a glimpse in Korean culture, check out this calendar of films, art exhibitions and traditional music and dance performances, which will take place at the Drama Theater and Building 19.
  • Concert by Zade Dirani, Oct. 10, Al Rayyan Theatre, 5pm to 9pm. This Jordanian American composer and “piano progeny” is known for his genre-blending songs inspired by Arabic, Latin, pop and classical music. He has previously performed for Queen Elizabeth, the Dalai Lama, Nelson Mandela and with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Tickets to his concert are on sale at Fifty One East and Al Rayyan for QR100 (student) to QR250.

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  • Damien Hirst exhibition, Oct. 10 to Jan. 22, 2014, Qatar Museums Authority’s Al Riwaq exhibition space. This controversial British artist will unveil “Relics,” his largest exhibition ever and first Middle East display at past of the Qatar-UK year of culture 2013. The display is free and open to the public.
  • Logos Hope, floating book fair, Oct. 10 to 20, Doha Port, Berth #8, 2pm to 10pm. This boat returns to Qatar with some 5,000 book titles ranging from fiction, non-fiction, textbooks, children’s books, and more. In addition to book browsing, visitors can tour the “experience deck,” learn more about the boat and its mission, and eat at the cafe. There is an entrance fee of QR2 (free admission for children 16 years and younger), and visitors can access it via shuttle. There will be a Ladies Morning on Oct. 16 from 9am until 12pm, and the fair will reopen to the public in the afternoon.
  • Russell Peters, Oct. 20, Sheraton Doha Ballroom. This globally renowned Canadian comedian will make his Qatar debut this month, sharing humor that highlights racial, ethnic, class and cultural stereotypes. Tickets range from QR250 to QR550 and can be bought at the Sheraton Doha. The show is for those who are 21 years and older, and Qatari IDs or passports are required for entry.

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  • Noddy in Toyland, Oct. 24 to 26, Al Rayyan Theatre. Characters from a popular children’s television show that has been on the air in various iterations since the 1950s will perform in Qatar soon. The star of the show is Noddy, who will save the day from two naughty Goblins who try to spoil all the fun. Tickets are on sale at Virgin Megastore and cost QR100, QR150, QR225 and QR350 (VIP). Children under two are admitted for free.
  • Bob Sinclair, Oct. 31, Grand Hyatt Doha, 6pm to 2am. This French record producer and DJ, credited with “putting the groove back on the dance of floor,” is returning to Qatar. Tickets are on sale at Virgin Megastore and cost QR250 and QR450 (VIP).

What are your plans this month?

Credit: Photos by QPW, Yvette Wohn, and Noddy in Toyland.

The Qatar Museums Authority will be reorganizing itself into a “private entity for public good,” chairwoman Shaikha Al Mayassa Al Thani has announced. 

In a memo sent to staff today addressing this week’s controversy, she said the government of Qatar has approved QMA’s request to transition away from being a state-run entity, due to the bureaucratic requirements that entails.

The Museums Authority has been under fire this week following a scathing newspaper column published in Al Arab on Sunday accusing its expatriate management of corruption and nepotism.

QMA drew even more criticism after it responded to Faisal Al Marzoqi’s piece with the threat of legal action.

Under the new status, the authority would no longer be required to follow certain government regulations regarding hiring and other processes, but would still be subject to oversight by the State Audit Bureau, Al Thani said. She continued:

“With our transition there will be new policies put in place to govern the organisation encompassing finance, human resources, the tendering process, etc.

This transition will also require more individual accountability: employees of the QMA will be expected to take more responsibility and I have no doubt you will all meet this expectation.”

Al Thani, sister of the new Emir, also put to rest rumors that she was leaving the organization or that it was merging with the Ministry of Culture, Arts and Heritage.

She did not discuss a timeline for QMA’s transition, but said executive director Ed Dolman would announce details in the coming weeks.

She also threw her support behind Dolman, the former head of the world’s largest auction house Christie’s, who has received much criticism from some members of the Qatari community in messages posted on Twitter this week.

In her email, Al Thani said:

“All his staffing decisions have been made based on professional merit and have no foundation in cultural divisiveness as suggested recently by a journalist in the social media.

Our Qatari to non-Qatari staff is a reflection of the reality of our society. Experts and specialists are employed on the basis of need; parallel to this we have over 60 scholars studying under QMA scholarship — studying subjects such as urban planning, architecture, art history and fine arts.”

The chairwoman also called freedom of the press an “integral part of our community,” but expressed disappointment at what she called falsely circulated information.

She concluded by emphasizing the authority’s need to hire experienced expats:

The best museums in the world are run by international staff and the best people are employed on the basis of their knowledge not of their nationality. Qatar and the QMA are a reflection of this global reality.

You have my commitment and that of Ed Dolman, who agreed to step in as acting CEO at my request, to continue to develop the QMA with the highest level of professional business ethics and practices.

Here are her full remarks, in Arabic and English:

Thoughts?

Credit: Photo via Wikimedia Commons

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The Qatar Museums Authority will be reorganizing itself into a “private entity for public good,” chairwoman Shaikha Al Mayassa Al Thani has announced. 

In a memo sent to staff today addressing this week’s controversy, she said the government of Qatar has approved QMA’s request to transition away from being a state-run entity, due to the bureaucratic requirements that entails.

The Museums Authority has been under fire this week following a scathing newspaper column published in Al Arab on Sunday accusing its expatriate management of corruption and nepotism.

QMA drew even more criticism after it responded to Faisal Al Marzoqi’s piece with the threat of legal action.

Under the new status, the authority would no longer be required to follow certain government regulations regarding hiring and other processes, but would still be subject to oversight by the State Audit Bureau, Al Thani said. She continued:

“With our transition there will be new policies put in place to govern the organisation encompassing finance, human resources, the tendering process, etc.

This transition will also require more individual accountability: employees of the QMA will be expected to take more responsibility and I have no doubt you will all meet this expectation.”

Al Thani, sister of the new Emir, also put to rest rumors that she was leaving the organization or that it was merging with the Ministry of Culture, Arts and Heritage.

She did not discuss a timeline for QMA’s transition, but said executive director Ed Dolman would announce details in the coming weeks.

She also threw her support behind Dolman, the former head of the world’s largest auction house Christie’s, who has received much criticism from some members of the Qatari community in messages posted on Twitter this week.

In her email, Al Thani said:

“All his staffing decisions have been made based on professional merit and have no foundation in cultural divisiveness as suggested recently by a journalist in the social media.

Our Qatari to non-Qatari staff is a reflection of the reality of our society. Experts and specialists are employed on the basis of need; parallel to this we have over 60 scholars studying under QMA scholarship — studying subjects such as urban planning, architecture, art history and fine arts.”

The chairwoman also called freedom of the press an “integral part of our community,” but expressed disappointment at what she called falsely circulated information.

She concluded by emphasizing the authority’s need to hire experienced expats:

The best museums in the world are run by international staff and the best people are employed on the basis of their knowledge not of their nationality. Qatar and the QMA are a reflection of this global reality.

You have my commitment and that of Ed Dolman, who agreed to step in as acting CEO at my request, to continue to develop the QMA with the highest level of professional business ethics and practices.

Here are her full remarks, in Arabic and English:

Thoughts?

Credit: Photo via Wikimedia Commons