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Wakrah Stadium workers

SCDL

Wakrah Stadium workers

Big strides are being made at the Al Wakrah World Cup stadium site, as construction on the venue’s “superstructure” progresses, organizers have said.

In a statement this week, the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SCDL) said substructure work has been completed.

A few months earlier, organizers mentioned that the stands are now beginning to rise from the ground.

Wakrah Stadium works

SCDL

Wakrah Stadium works

Additionally, several cranes are going up to help build the steel structure of the stadium.

The 40,000 capacity arena will host the quarter finals of the 2022 World Cup.

The progress so far

By the end of this year, workers will tackle the foundation before getting started on the stadium structure, according to project manager Thani Al Zarraa.

The main contractor MIDMAC, which is a joint venture with PORR Qatar and Six Construction, will soon install six tower cranes around the site.

One of them weighs a massive 40 tonnes and five others, 20 tonnes each.

In a statement, Al Zarraa added:

“Works have also commenced on the mess hall for the construction workers on site, which are currently near 400. We are also working on additional site offices that will have an area for stadium models.”

Earlier this year, the Al Wakrah Stadium attained an added layer of significance following the death of reputed architect Zaha Hadid, who had designed the venue.

Al Wakrah Stadium

SCDL

Al Wakrah Stadium

She had been inspired by the traditional dhow boats used by pearl divers from the region, and her stadium features a steel structure that mirrors the inside of a dhow.

What to expect

In addition to hosting the games, the arena of Al Wakrah stadium will be the future home of Al Wakrah Sports Club.

There will also be a new sports center and community hub, the SCDL said.

Al Wakrah Stadium

2022 Supreme Committee

Al Wakrah Stadium

The precinct will have space for a range of community facilities. They include a park, mosque, school, hotel, wedding hall, vocational training center and retail outlets.

Al Wakrah Stadium is on track to be completed by the fourth quarter of 2018.

After 2022, the stadium will be reduced to 20,000 seats, with the upper tiers sent to developing countries in need of sporting infrastructure.

Thoughts?
Qatari police officers on the beat in Manchester

Greater Manchester Police

Qatari police officers on the beat in Manchester

Qatari police cadets have been out and about on the streets of Manchester this summer to learn more about community policing from British officers.

The link-up is part of an ongoing agreement between the two countries.

As part of that deal, Qatar has paid the Greater Manchester Police to help train its officers in advance of the 2022 World Cup.

Criticism

The agreement has apparently drawn criticism in the UK by those concerned with a Qatar partnership.

However, Greater Manchester Mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Lloyd defended the deal by saying:

“Because of Qatar’s lamentable human rights record, I did not take the decision to approve this contract lightly, and made sure to consult widely not least with the Independent Ethics Committee.

On balance it is an appropriate and ethical step to take. If we can educate and improve policing in other countries, for the good of its citizens, then that should be welcomed.”

Thoughts?

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

QFA

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Qatar will restrict the availability of alcohol during the 2022 World Cup “whatever the criticism might be” if drinking contributes to violence and disorder at the games, organizers have said.

The comments came after France decided to impose a ban on alcohol sales near European Championship venues in June, following several incidents of football-related hooliganism.

Dozens of staff from Qatar’s Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy (SCDL) had been shadowing Euro 2016 organizers during this time, including assistant secretary general Nasser Al-Khater.

Nasser Al Khater

Twitter

Nasser Al Khater

Speaking to the Associated Press about the experience this week en route to the Rio Olympics, Al-Khater said:

“The strange thing we saw, as soon as some of the violence picked up in France, the first thing people spoke about was banning alcohol around the stadiums 24 or 48 hours before the match and during the match.

So that means there is a recognition that sometimes alcohol could relate to or encourage some sort of violence. So we need to take that into consideration to make sure the balance that we strike is right. And we want to make sure that Qatar in 2022 will be a violence free World Cup.”

He added that Qatar is reviewing all security measures to ensure there is no repeat of what happened in France.

Fans to be treated ’very gently’

There remain many questions about how Qatar, a conservative Muslim country, will manage the sale of liquor to football fans during 2022.

Organizers have previously discussed having special fan zones in which alcohol will be available for purchase.

And earlier this year, the head of the SCDL said that Qatar’s government was planning to set up special courts to deal “very gently” with drunk and rowdy fans during the tournament.

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

Andreas Levers / Flickr

Photo for illustrative purposes only.

While drinking in licensed bars and clubs in Qatar is legal, getting caught drunk in public places can have serious ramifications.

However, Secretary General Hassan Al Thawadi said in February:

“In relation to drunk fans it will be as it is anywhere else. Anyone who is rowdy, anyone who breaches the law, will be very gently – depending on how they react – taken care of in a manner to make sure that people are not disrupting the public order.

Thoughts?